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Saint Joseph Hill AcademyUnder the Direction of the Daughters of Divine Charity

Social Studies

Department Courses:

Global 9

The course begins with the Paleolithic Era and the development of the first civilizations, continues with an examination of classical societies, and traces the expansion of trade networks and their global impact. The course emphasizes the key themes of interactions over time, shifts in political power, and the role of belief systems. Students will examine how the world is interconnected, and analyze the results produced.

Global 10

This course examines the major historical trends during the period 1750 A.D. to the present. Considerable emphasis is given to current events as they relate to the historical patterns of the last two centuries. Much of the course work will focus the student’s attention on the level of reading and style of writing necessary for successful completion of the New York State Regents exam in Global History and Geography.  

US History 11

Students enrolled in this course will study United States History with focus on America’s emerging role as a leader in world politics. The course will also offer an economic overview from a historical perspective and firm commitment to the role of current events in shaping past, present and future historical trends. Much of the course work will focus the student’s attention on the level of reading and style of writing necessary for successful completion of the N.Y. State Regents exam in U.S. History and Government.

Economics

The general objective of a high school economics course is for students to master fundamental economic concepts, appreciate how the principal concepts of economics relate to each other and understand the structure of economic systems. Students will use economic concepts in a reasoned, careful manner in dealing with personal, community, national and global economic issues. They will use measurement concepts and methods such as tables, charts, graphs, ratios, percentages and index numbers to understand and interpret relevant data. They should learn to make reasoned decisions on economics.  

Government 

In this course, students apply knowledge gained in previous years of study to pursue a deeper understanding of the institutions of American Government. In addition, they draw on their studies of world and American history and geography and other societies to compare differences and similarities in world governmental systems today. This course is the culmination of history/social sciences classes to prepare students to solve society1s problems, to understand and to participate in the governmental process, and to be a responsible citizen of the United States and the world.

AP United States Government and Politics

Offered to select Seniors, This course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U S  government and politics and the analysis of specific examples  It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute US  government and politics  While there is no single approach that an AP United States Government and Politics course must follow, students should become acquainted with the variety of theoretical perspectives and explanations for various behaviors and outcomes  Certain topics are usually covered in all college courses  The following is a discussion of these topics and some questions that should be explored in the course.  

AP United States History

U.S. History students investigate significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in nine historical periods from approximately 1491 to the present. Students develop and use the same skills, practices, and methods employed by historians: analyzing primary and secondary sources; developing historical arguments; making historical comparisons; and utilizing reasoning about contextualization, causation, and continuity and change over time. The course also provides seven themes that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places: American and national identity; migration and settlement; politics and power; work, exchange, and technology; America in the world; geography and the environment; and culture and society.

AP European History

AP European History is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester introductory college or university European history course. In AP European History students investigate significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in four historical periods from approximately 1450 to the present. Students develop and use the same skills, practices, and methods employed by historians: analyzing primary and secondary sources; developing historical arguments; making historical comparisons; and utilizing reasoning about contextualization, causation, and continuity and change over time. The course also provides six themes that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places: interaction of Europe and the world; poverty and prosperity; objective knowledge and subjective visions; states and other institutions of power; individual and society; and national and European identity.

AP Psychology

The AP Psychology course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals.  Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. They also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice.